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Wondrous Words Wednesday

May 1, 2019

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

I found one new to me word in MY LOVELY WIFE by Samantha Downing.

1. roshambo – “As we walk into the office, Jenna and Rory play roshambo to see who goes first.”

Roshambo is the game of rock paper scissors. (as three words, ro sham bo) the syllables called out by players of rock paper scissors to synchronize their timing.  We’ve always called that game “Rock, Paper, Scissors,” so I’ve never heard this word.  What do you call the game?

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

Mailbox Monday

April 29, 2019

 

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a meme started by Marcia and now hosted on its own blog.  There were no physical books in my mailbox last week but I did receive two e-books.

Were there any books in your mailbox?

The Week in Review: 04.26.2019

April 26, 2019
tags:

the-week-in-review

Between the Covers

Finished last week:

I’m sure most people are aware of the violence that grips Chicago on a fairly regular basis.  If you’re removed from the area, you probably write it off as gang warfare or drugs and don’t give it a lot of thought.  In AN AMERICAN SUMMER: LOVE AND DEATH IN CHICAGO, Alex Kotlowitz puts a human face on the violence by telling the story of some individuals who live and survive in the Windy City.  People like Eddie Bocanegra who killed a rival gang member as a teen, served time for it, and is now working to prevent violence.  People like Ramaine Hill who witnessed a shooting, told police what he knew, and ultimately paid for doing the right thing.  People like Anita Stewart, a social worker who works in a local school, and tries to help students cope with violence and death daily.

This book is compelling and heartbreaking.  It made me angry and wonder why we’re not doing more to stem the violence and help the children affected by it.  It is heartfelt and well written and moved me to tears more than once.  It’s an important book and one that I recommend to everyone – it’s a must read for those interested in social issues.  The author narrates the audio version of AN AMERICAN SUMMER and does an outstanding job.  (Review copy provided by Penguin Random House.)

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BROTHER, SISTER, ME AND YOU by Mary Quattlebaum is published by National Geographic Kids so I had high expectations when I picked it up and I’m happy to say I wasn’t disappointed.  This book features high quality, full color photographs of animals and rhyming verse that is sure to please youngsters.  It shows animals at play and reminds children that they do the same things with their own siblings.  There’s an Afterword by Dr. Tavah Klein that speaks to parents about the sibling relationship and there are Animal Facts about each of the animals pictured that parents can share as their readers get older.  This is a great book for early readers, especially those with a new sibling.  As a matter of fact, I think this book would make a great big brother/sister gift.  (Review copy provided by Media Masters Publicity.)

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SOUTHERN LADY CODE is an essay collection by Helen Ellis.  Ellis is from Alabama but has spent most of her adult life in New York.  She’s adapted to life in the north while holding on to some of her Southern values.  She writes of her love of gay men, her need for a Burberry trench coat, how to be a perfect guest, and when to write thank you notes, among other things.  I’d heard a lot about this book before I picked it up and, at first, I wondered why people recommended it and thought it was so funny.  It took a little while but the book did eventually pick up for me.  At times, though, I felt like Ellis was trying just a little too hard.  In the end, I found the collection to be uneven and I liked the book, but didn’t love it.  That’s not to say a few of the stories weren’t spot on but more of them were misses than hits for me.  Ellis reads the audio version herself and does a great job with it.  (Review copy provided by Penguin Random House.)

Currently reading:

On the Screen

Not much of anything.

Off the blog

  • We were happy to have a nice, quiet Easter with a family dinner followed by a board game.
  • Carl’s father passed away Tuesday morning and we’ll be heading up for the funeral soon.  The last few years were tough for him.  He will be missed by all who knew him.
  • I walked at least three miles every morning and averaged almost 17,750 Fitbit steps a day.

What’s going on in your corner of the world?

Wondrous Words Wednesday

April 24, 2019

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

My first word is from DREAMLAND by Sam Quinones.

1. appartchik – “As a group, it appears none fell to it harder than the children of Russian Pentecostals who came fleeing persecution and found U.S. pop culture a greater challenge than anything a Soviet appartchik could invent.”

Appartchik is often used in a derogatory manner and means a member of a Communist Party apparat.    

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This word is from INHERITANCE by Dani Shapiro

2. accretion – “I have spent my life attempting to make meaning out of random events, to shape stories out of an accretion of senseless, chaotic detail.”

Accretion is a noun that means a thing formed or added by gradual growth or increase.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

Mailbox Monday

April 22, 2019

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a meme started by Marcia and now hosted on its own blog.

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

What was in your mailbox?

The Week in Review: 04.19.2019

April 19, 2019
tags:

the-week-in-review

Between the Covers

Finished last week:

When Dave Cullen wrote of the shootings at Columbine High School, he focused on the killers and their possible motivations.  Researching and writing that book affected him deeply (even causing PTSD) and he swore he’d never write about an event like that again but things changed with the shooting at Marjorie Douglas Stoneman High School.  This time, instead of writing about the killers, Cullen wrote of the victims and their reaction to the shooting.

I’m sure most people remember Emma González’s “We Call BS” speech and recall seeing David Hogg on television immediately after the tragedy but not everyone knows they, along with numerous other students, founded March for Our Lives, an organization dedicated to preventing more shootings by pushing for stricter gun control laws.  They didn’t just focus on school shootings, though, because

In the first six months of 2018, over 1,700 kids were killed or injured by guns, heavily concentrated in the inner cities.

As I expected with Cullen, I found PARKLAND: BIRTH OF A MOVEMENT to be meticulously researched and well written.  I’ve followed Hogg and González on Twitter and in the media so a lot of the information wasn’t new to me, though.  If you haven’t followed them the way I have and you’re interested in learning more about these amazing kids and their tremendous efforts, you’ll want to pick this book up.  (Review copy provided by Harper Collins.)

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I’m a big fan of National Geographic Kids books and was excited to read one of their Little Kids First Board BooksSPACE by Ruth A. Musgrave introduces preschoolers to the basics of space with simple vocabulary and beautiful, full color photographs and illustrations.  This book measures approximately seven inches square and has thick, sturdy pages that are perfect for little fingers.  Musgrave starts with Earth, and “zooms out” to include the sun, the moon, the other planets, and the Milky Way galaxy.  She even includes spacecraft and astronauts and concludes with a few activities to keep little ones engaged.  I loved this nonfiction book and feel sure children will pick it up over and over again.  It’s a great way to present space to the youngsters in your life.  (Review copy provided by Media Masters Publicity.)

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FIELD NOTES ON LOVE by Jennifer E. Smith is a sweet YA book.  It’s the story of Hugo, a British sextuplet who’s booked a train trip across the US with his girlfriend during the summer before college.  They break up before they leave, though, and the trip is non-refundable and booked in her name. Hugo advertises on the internet for another Margaret Campbell to travel with him.  Enter Mae, an American girl who was raised by two dads and is also entering college in the fall.  Mae will be attending USC and wants to study film.  The movie she used with her application didn’t make the cut and she’s very disappointed.

Hugo and Mae agree to travel together as companions but sparks fly and you can guess what happens.  Besides the romance, though, the two learn a thing or two about themselves and make some decisions about the future.  Even though this book is predictable, I thought it was a lot of fun.  I had to suspend disbelief with the storyline but it wasn’t hard to do because the characters are so great.  I fell in love with them and rooted for them the whole way.  The audio book is narrated by Anthony Mark Barrow and Karissa Vacker and they both do a terrific job.  Teens on up will love this entertaining story.  (Review copy provided by Penguin Random House.)

Currently reading:

On the Screen

Not much of anything.

Off the blog

  • Bad storms came through on Sunday and a tornado touched down in our little city.  Thankfully, no one was hurt.
  • Carl’s dad spent a few days in the hospital and Carl made a quick trip up to see him.
  • I walked at least three miles every morning and averaged just over 19,550 Fitbit steps a day.

What’s going on in your corner of the world?

Wondrous Words Wednesday

April 17, 2019

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

This word is from the movie The Best of Enemies.

1. charrette – In the movie, a KKK leader and a black activist clashed over integration.  Rather than rule on it, a local judge ordered the city council to conduct a charrette, something I’d never heard of.

A charrette is a meeting in which all stakeholders in a project attempt to resolve conflicts and map solutions.    

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What words do you want to celebrate today?