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Wondrous Words Wednesday

August 15, 2018

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

I found a few new to me words in PEOPLE KILL PEOPLE by Ellen Hopkins.

1. dox– “Could be you once doxxed a particularly obnoxious teacher who displayed favoritism toward his white students.”

Dox is a verb that means to search for and publish private or identifying information about someone on the Internet, typically with malicious intent.

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2. affray – “Step into the affray.”

Affray is an instance of fighting in a public place that disturbs the peace.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

Mailbox Monday

August 13, 2018

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a meme started by Marcia and now hosted on its own blog.   I found thise book in my mailbox last week:

Wednesday

What did you find in your mailbox?

The Week in Review: 08.10.2018

August 10, 2018
tags:

the-week-in-review

Between the Covers

Finished last week:

Quincy Carpenter survived a horrible attack that left four others dead to become what the press dubbed a “Final Girl.”  There are two other Final Girls but they’ve never met.  When one of them dies of an apparent suicide, Sam, the third one comes to New York to meet Quincy.  Sam wants to talk about the past – a past Quincy would just soon put behind her.  But, as more and more details, come to light Quincy starts to remember things from that bloody night years ago and finds herself in a race for her life.

FINAL GIRLS by Riley Sager is well written with plenty of tension and twists to keep readers flipping the page.  I liked Quincy and wanted her to recover from her past and get on with her life.  I did have trouble believing one key item in the book but that didn’t keep me from enjoying it.  I wouldn’t go so far as to say I loved it but I did like it a great deal.  The audio version is narrated by Erin Bennett and Hillary Huber and I thought they both did a great job.  (Review copy provided by Penguin Random House.)

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SARAI AND THE MEANING OF AWESOME by Sarai Gonzalez and Monica Brown is an early reader book about determination, family, and love.  Sarai and her family live close to her grandparents and see them often – in fact, her grandfather stays with Sarai and her sisters after school each day.  When the owner of the house her grandparents rent decides to sell it, Sarai’s grandfather tells her they can’t afford to buy it and will have to move.  Sarai can’t stand the thought of being away from her grandparents and springs into action to try to raise money to help buy the house.  A house costs more than she realizes, though, so she has to come up with another plan.

I thought Sarai was a great character.  Her parents immigrated to the US and have taught her the importance of family.  When they face a crisis, she’s full of creative ideas and ready to jump in with both feet.  I appreciated the fact that her ideas were age appropriate and realistic.  I think young readers will like Sarai, too, and just might be inspired by her. Christine Almeda‘s illustrations are the perfect touch to bring the story to life.  (Review copy provided by Scholastic.)

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THE HOUSE SWAP by Rebecca Fleet is a domestic thriller in the vein that’s so popular right now.  Caroline and Francis are trying to revive their troubled marriage so they decide to get away by listing their house on a house swap website.  When an offer comes through, it sounds like exactly what they’re looking for but, when they get there, Caroline gets an uneasy feeling about the person they’ve swapped houses with – it seems this person knows more about Caroline than she wants her to.

I had mixed feelings about this book.  I thought Fleet’s writing was outstanding – almost too good for this genre to be honest – but I wanted the story to have a faster pace and more tension than it did.  There was enough to keep me invested in the story but I wanted more from it.  This is the author’s debut novel and I see a lot of potential in it so will definitely be reading whatever she writes next.  (Review copy provided by Penguin Random House.)

Currently reading:

On the Screen

Not much of anything.

Off the blog

  • Carl and I took a day trip to the mountains.
  • Thursday marked 11 years in our current home.  I’ve only lived in one place longer.
  • The winner of THE SHORTEST WAY HOME by Miriam Parker is Ti.
  • I’ve had, and loved, a Fitbit One for years.  It went dark when I was at the beach last week and then came back to life.  This week, I got some error messages on it so I decided it was time to replace it.  Unfortunately, they no longer make the One so I went with a Fitbit Zip.
  • Speaking of Fitbit, we walked at least three miles every morning and I averaged almost 15,500 Fitbit steps a day.

What’s going on in your corner of the world?

Wondrous Words Wednesday

August 8, 2018

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

I found this word in THE HOUSE SWAP by Rebecca Fleet.

1. astrolabe – “It’s an astrolabe.”

An astrolabe is an instrument formerly used to make astronomical measurements, typically of the altitudes of celestial bodies, and in navigation for calculating latitude, before the development of the sextant.

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This word came from THE ULTIMATE BOOK OF SHARKS by Brian Skerry with Elizabeth Carney and Sarah Wassner Flynn.

2. barbel – “Angel sharks have whisker-like barbels near their mouth, which they use to detect prey.”

Even though the sentence explains it, I looked this up.  A barbel is a fleshy filament growing from the mouth or snout of a fish.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

Mailbox Monday

August 6, 2018

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a meme started by Marcia and now hosted on its own blog.   I found these books in my mailbox last week:

Monday

Tuesday

Friday

Saturday

What did you find in your mailbox?

The Week in Review: 08.03.2018

August 3, 2018
tags:

the-week-in-review

Between the Covers

Finished last week:

BIRDS AND THEIR FEATHERS by Britta Teckentrup is a gorgeous book about, you guessed it, birds and the function of their feathers.  Readers learn about the different types of feathers, their structure, and their purpose.  Feathers do so much more than help birds fly – they protect them from the cold, help them walk on snow, help them hear, and more.  Even their colors serve a purpose, including camouflage and attracting a mate.  Feathers are so vital to a bird’s well being, they have to take special care of them.

This lovely book also includes tidbits about feathers in culture and how humans have used feathers.  It’s printed on heavy duty matte paper and Teckentrup’s illustrations are simply beautiful – I think many of the pages are frame worthy.  Pick this book up for curious early readers – you won’t be disappointed! (Review copy provided by Media Masters Publicity.)

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When Camas Davis lost her job as the food editor for Portland Monthly, she didn’t know what to do next.  When she found a forgotten about credit card, she decided to use it to travel to France to learn butchery.  She shares her experience and the way it changed her life in her memoir, KILLING IT: AN EDUCATION.  As the founder of the Portland Meat Collective, Davis is well known in the butchery world.  I love memoirs and reading about women who break down barriers so I was anxious to pick this book up.  I thought it was well written (although some of the descriptions of butchery were pretty intense) but have mixed feelings about it.  I really liked that Davis made me think about where the meat I eat comes from and how it was treated before it was slaughtered but, to me, she came across somewhat intolerant of people who don’t share her views.  She also implied that everyone in France gets their meat from small producers like the one she worked with and, since I lived there for two years, I know that’s not true.  In the end, I’m glad I read the book – it’s thoughtful and thought provoking.  I’d love to talk to someone else who’s read the book, so I think KILLING IT would be great for book clubs.  (Review copy provided by Penguin Press.)

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CONVENIENCE STORE WOMAN by Sayaka Murata is a quirky little book about Keiko, a young woman who takes a job at a convenience store as an 18 year old student and, 18 years later is still working in the same job.  Keiko is socially awkward and generally takes her cues from those around her but is comfortable at work where she knows what’s expected of her.  She’s happy with her job and her life but when she continues to be pressured to get married and find a career she makes a rash decision.

This book was translated from Japanese by Ginny Tapley Takemori and, as far as I can remember, it’s the first book translated from Japanese that I’ve read.  It’s a small book so it was a quick read and I thought it was delightful.  The characters are good, the writing is solid, and the storyline is unique.  I was captivated from the beginning and breezed through this little gem.  (Review copy provided by Grove Press.)

 

Currently reading:

 

On the Screen

Not much of anything.

Off the blog

  • I spent a couple of days at the beach with a friend and her kids and just got back last night.
  • I walked while I was at the beach but I’m not sure how far and managed to average just over 18,400 Fitbit steps a day.

What’s going on in your corner of the world?

Wondrous Words Wednesday

August 1, 2018

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

These words came from CONVENIENCE STORE WOMAN by Sayaka Murata.

1. skive – “If I went along with the manager when he was annoyed or joined in the general irritation at someone skiving off the night shift, there was a strange sense of solidarity as everyone seemed pleased that I was angry too.”

Skive is a verb that means to avoid work or a duty by staying away or leaving early; shirk.

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2. freeter – “When I was in my early twenties it wasn’t unusual to be a freeter, so I didn’t really make excuses.”

According to Wikipedia, “freeter is a Japanese expression for people who lack full-time employment or are unemployed, excluding housewives and students. The term originally included young people who deliberately chose not to become salary-men, even though jobs were available at the time.”

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3. expurgate – “Unless I’m cured, normal people will expurgate me.”

Expurgate is a verb that means to cleanse of something morally harmful, offensive, or erroneous.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?