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Wondrous Words Wednesday

June 28, 2017

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

I found quite a few words in ELEANOR OLIPHANT IS COMPLETELY FINE by Gail Honeyman.  Here are several more.

1. numerate – “‘I mean, you’re numerate, right?’.”

Yes, I would say I am numerate.  Numerate means having a good basic knowledge of arithmetic; able to understand and work with numbers.

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2. badinage – “The next step would have been effortlessly witty badinage, but unfortunately we were some way away from that.”

Badinage is humorous or witty conversation.

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3. dipsomaniac – “I didn’t want Raymond to think I was a dipsomaniac.”

A dipsomaniac is a drunkard or alcoholic.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

Mailbox Monday

June 26, 2017

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a meme started by Marcia and now hosted on its own blog.  I found these goodies in my mailbox last week:

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Friday

What did you find in your mailbox?

The Week in Review: 06.23.2017

June 23, 2017
tags: ,

the-week-in-review

Between the Covers

Finished last week:

PURE HEART: A SPIRITED TALE OF GRACE, GRIT, AND WHISKEY by Troylyn Ball and Bret Witter is the memoir of a remarkable woman who was the first female to distill moonshine legally.  Ball was raised in Texas with an entrepreneurial spirit but dedicated herself to her family after the birth of two disabled sons.  She and her husband, Charlie, moved to Asheville, North Carolina, in search of a better home for their children when she felt the need to start a business of her own.  She settled on moonshine and put her all into a business that would change her life and preserve her family’s.  I enjoyed Ball’s story and admire her determination and guts.  Asheville is not too far from my adopted home and it’s a place I’m very familiar with so I really enjoyed the setting and feel Ball did a great job capturing the eccentric character of the city.  You won’t want to miss this inspiring story of one strong woman!  (Review copy provided by Harper Collins.)

Lucy and Owen decide to explore an open marriage for six months in Sarah Dunn’s latest novel, THE ARRANGEMENT, but they both have to abide by carefully set out rules.  They need a break from the drudgery of their lives and they feel their marriage is strong enough to survive this experiment.  As you would expect, things don’t go exactly the way they planned.  I listened to the audio version of this book and I thought Ellen Archer’s narration was good but the book was just okay.  I didn’t think it covered a lot of new ground and found it pretty predictable.  I also found a lot of the characters annoying.  It does tackle a few current issues so I do think it would make a good book club selection.

Princess Harriet Hamsterbone is off on a mission to find Heady the Hydra’s stolen egg.  Her friend Wilbur joins her and they find themselves in the Forest of Misery where they encounter the evil Gothel.  They follow her and discover she’s got Ratpunzel locked in a tower.  Can Harriet save her or is Gothel’s magic too much for the young hamster?  HAMSTER PRINCESS: RATPUNZEL by Ursula Vernon is such a fun book for middle grade readers!  The story is great and the illustrations are too.  The book is printed on high quality paper and there’s even glitter embedded in the cover!  Young readers, especially girls, are going to love this adventure!  (Review copy provided by Penguin Random House.)

Currently reading:

On the Screen

Paris Can Wait starring Diane Lane is the story of Anne, a neglected wife, who travels from Cannes to Paris with Jacques, her husband’s French associate.  Jacques is in no hurry to get to Paris and takes many side trips to show Anne the sites and treat her to meals in special restaurants.  My friend and I met in France so we thought the movie sounded charming but we both found it slow.  The scenery was gorgeous and we did enjoy seeing places we were familiar with but neither of us loved the movie.  The ending is rather open ended but we both though it suited the story.  Foodies will love the food scenes but this is one to wait for on streaming.

 

Off the blog

  • I’ve been a little under the weather this week and finally made it to the doctor yesterday.  She prescribed a couple things so, hopefully, I’m on the mend now.
  • I walked at least three miles every morning and averaged almost 21,000 Fitbit steps a day.

What’s going on in your corner of the world?

Wondrous Words Wednesday

June 21, 2017

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

ELEANOR OLIPHANT IS COMPLETELY FINE by Gail Honeyman was the source of a lot of new words for me.

1. zetabetical– “I’d cleaned the bathroom and washed the kitchen floor, taken out the recycling and arranged all the tins in the cupboard so that the labels were facing forwards in zetabetical order.”

I could figure out the meaning of this word but decided to look it up and couldn’t find a formal definition so I’m not sure if it’s a real word or something the author made up.  Either way, I love it.  It means the opposite of alphabetical order.

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2. descant – “There was birdsong, a descant over the sounds of a television drifting through an open window.”

In music, descant means an independent treble melody usually sung or played above a basic melody.

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3. hamartia – “The flaw in my plan, the hamartia, was this; there were no tickets available.”

Hamartia means a fatal flaw leading to the downfall of a tragic hero or heroine.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

Mailbox Monday

June 19, 2017

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a meme started by Marcia and now hosted on its own blog.  I found these goodies in my mailbox last week:

Monday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

What did you find in your mailbox?

The Week in Review: 06.16.2017

June 16, 2017
tags:

the-week-in-review

Between the Covers

Finished last week:

Jessica Abel explores the world of narrative nonfiction radio programs in her documentary comic OUT ON THE WIRE: THE STORYTELLING SECRETS OF THE NEW MASTERS OF RADIO.  The book evolved from a comic she created for a pledge drive for This American Life and features shows like it.  Abel covers topics like brainstorming, voice, story structure, and sound.  I don’t listen to the radio often but do enjoy shows like this so I found the book interesting.  It’s obviously well researched and the drawings are great but I’m not sure the book will hold wide appeal so I’d only recommend it to radio and podcast fans.  (I won this book from Read It Forward.)

ELEANOR OLIPHANT IS COMPLETELY FINE by Gail Honeyman is the story of a damaged young woman who uses structure and routine to maintain her equilibrium.  Eleanor’s social skills aren’t great so she stays to herself most of the time.  When she and Raymond, a co-worker of hers, help a man who fell and is unconscious, they become friends and Raymond helps her confront her past.  Even though I saw the ending coming, I thought this book was delightful!  The characters are quirky and there’s enough tension in the story to keep readers invested.  This book made me chuckle even while it made me think.  I loved Eleanor and Raymond and would love to read more of their story.  I talked about this book with someone else who’s read it and, we had so much to say, we decided it would make a great book club selection.   (Review copy provided by Penguin Random House.)

If you know any young readers who like creepy crawly things, you’ll want to grab a copy of BUGS! by James Buckley, Jr for them.  This is the third book in the Amazing Animal Facts series from Animal Planet Chapter Books and it is chock full of fun facts and fabulous photos.  I learned quite a few things as I read this 4th grade level book, such as insects walk by moving three legs at a time in what is known as a tripod gait and dragonflies haven’t changed much in over 300 million years.  The back of this great book includes resources, a list of insect orders, and an index.  I think budding young scientist, especially boys, will love this book!  (Review copy provided by Blue Slip Media.)

Currently reading:

On the Screen

Not much of anything.

Off the blog

  • I celebrated my 9th blogiversary this week – I started this blog on June 12, 2008 and never would have guessed the things I would learn, the places I would visit, or the friends I would make along the way.
  • Carl spent some time at his dad’s and came home sick so I worked more this week.

  • I started a new puzzle but didn’t have much time to work on it so I didn’t get very far.  Yes, it’s a Christmas puzzle – I found it marked down.
  • I walked at least three miles every morning and averaged just over 20, 150 Fitbit steps a day.

 

What’s going on in your corner of the world?

Wondrous Words Wednesday

June 14, 2017

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

I found one more word in my advanced copy of KISS CARLO by Adriana Trigiani.

1. carabiniere – “The new road from the village down the mountain to the main highway was traveled with such frequency that Carlo ordered traffic signs made and requested that a carabiniere be assigned to deal with the traffic as it flowed into and out of the village.”

A carabiniere is a member of the Italian paramilitary police.

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The next two words came from ELEANOR OLIPHANT IS COMPLETELY FINE by Gaily Honeyman

2. jerkin – “I pushed open the door, the chill of the aircon making me shudder, even though I was wearing my jerkin.”

A jerkin is a a close-fitting jacket or short coat, usually sleeveless, as one of leather worn in the 16th and 17th centuries.

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3. rebarbative – “‘It’s financially rebarbative, too,’ I said.”

Rebarbative means unattractive and objectionable.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?