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Wondrous Words Wednesday

October 15, 2014

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

I didn’t read a word while I was at the beach so I had to turn to my Word-a-Day calendar this week.

1. malapert – “‘Fair ladies, brave knights, churts, varlets, squires, scurvy knaves, men-at-arms, malapert rogues — all were merry.” — P. G. Wodehouse, The Man Upstairs and Other Stories

Malapert is an adjective that means impudently bold: saucy.

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2. yips – “[Texas manager Ron] Washington’s team has the yips, pure and simple.” —Sam Donnellon, Philadelphia Daily News, October 29, 2010

When I see yip, I think of a dog barking.  Yips means a state of nervous tension affecting an athlete (as a golfer) in the performance of a crucial action.

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3. concatenate – “As part of her presentation, Tiffany created a flow chart that concatenated all of the company’s suppliers and accounts.”

Concatenate means to link together in a series or chain.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

Author event and giveaway: Kim Boykin

October 14, 2014

Kim Boykin

Kim Boykin was in town for the launch of her new book, Palmetto Moon, and I was lucky enough to attend the event.   Kim is a South Carolina native who currently lives in North Carolina.  Her first book, The Wisdom of Hair, was the third best selling book at Fiction Addiction last year. In between her two books, Kim’s been writing romance novellas for Jane Porter’s venture, Tule Publishing.  Kim said it’s given her a lot of opportunities and helped her build her audience.

Palmetto Moon took Kim three months to write – it’s about a runaway bride from a high society family.  It’s told from four points of view and is set in Round O, South Carolina.  (For the record, there really is a Round O.)  The executive chef of S. N. O. B. in Charleston created some recipes for the story and they’re included in the back of the book!

Kim is currently working on her next book – A Peach of a Pair – about a girl from Alabama graduating with a degree in music.  A hurricane and tornado hit her town while she’s at school.  The book is due on January 5 and should be out next summer.

Thanks to the generosity of the author, I have an autographed copy of Palmetto Moon for one lucky reader.  To enter to win an autographed copy of PALMETTO MOON, simply fill out the entry form.  Contest is open worldwide – one entry per person, please.  I will use random.org to determine the winner.  Contest ends at midnight EDT Wednesday, October 22, 2014.    Comments are welcome (and appreciated) but will not get you an entry in the contest.

Mailbox Monday

October 13, 2014

Mailbox Monday October 13

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, a meme started by Marcia of To Be Continued, and now hosted on its own blog.  I’m late today because I just got back from the beach about a half hour ago.  I had a great time with my mom and sister and now I have to face reality again. Here are the books that showed up in my mailbox while I was gone:

What did you find in your mailbox last week?

Review – The Top Secret Diary of Celie Valentine: Friendship Over

October 11, 2014

Friendship Over

For her tenth birthday, Celie’s dad gives her a punching bag and a journal hoping they’ll help her whenever she’s struggling with her emotions.  Little did he know how soon she’d need that journal.  Celia’s best friend, Lula, was supposed to help her celebrate her birthday by watching movies and eating popcorn and sundaes but, at the last minute, Lula cancels out and Celia can’t figure out why.   Lula seems to have moved on but Celie is lost without her best friend.  When they’re referred to “Friendship Forward,” Celia dreads it but also hopes it will help.

At the same time, Celie’s grandmother is not doing well.  She’s become forgetful and is behaving oddly.  Celie’s mom goes to check on her.  Celie loves her grandmother and is worried about what will happen to her.

Celie shares her fears, loneliness, and frustrations in her new journal and finds a way to cope with all the changes going on around her.

The Top-Secret Diary of Celie Valentine: Friendship Over, by Julie Sternberg is a delightful book that middle grade readers (especially girls) are sure to love the way I did.  They’ll be able to relate to Celie and her problems and will enjoy the journal format the book is written in.  Besides Celie’s entries, it includes notes and cute drawings by Johanna Wright, making it a quick, fun read.

Celie’s parents are present but her mom is busy dealing with her own issues and her dad is busy with work, leaving Celie to mostly cope with her problems on her own.  She finds her journal and working through her feelings really helps.  Since this is for young readers, things turn out well in the end.

kid konnection newI will link this up to Booking Mama’s Saturday feature, Kid Konnection. If you’d like to participate in Kid Konnection and share a post about anything related to children’s books (picture, middle grade, or young adult) from the past week, leave a comment as well as a link on her site tomorrow.

Review copy provided by Blue Slip Media.  I am an Indiebound Affiliate.

Review: Tomboy

October 10, 2014

Tomboy

Liz Prince has always hated dresses and took a stand against them at the age of 4.  Her parents respected her opinion and allowed her to dress as she pleased – her favorite thing to wear was an old blazer handed down to her from her friend Ben.  When she started school and was expected to “follow the rules of gender,” she realized she’s a tomboy, which is defined as “a girl of boyish behavior.”  Liz says,

Obviously, this subject makes a lot of assumptions about gender, both male and female, and trying to define what makes a girl or what makes a boy is what got me so confused in the first place.

Throughout her adolescence, Prince was mistaken as a boy or as being gay but she found a few friends who accepted her the way she was and stayed true to herself.  She never really felt like she fit in, though, until she discovered The Tutorial School, a school that allows parents and students to set their own curriculum.

I really enjoyed Tomboy, Liz Prince‘s graphic memoir.  Prince does a great job showing what it’s like to be different as a kid.  I loved that her parents respected her wishes and she remained true to herself even when she was teased.  I really like the way this book explores gender identity – it’s sure to spark some great discussions.  This book will appeal to teenagers – both boys and girls – on up and should provide comfort to many.

Prince does a great job telling her story in a compact manner and her terrific illustrations enhance the story.  I loved Tomboy and recommend it to others.

Tomboy interior

kid konnection newI will link this up to Booking Mama’s Saturday feature, Kid Konnection. If you’d like to participate in Kid Konnection and share a post about anything related to children’s books (picture, middle grade, or young adult) from the past week, leave a comment as well as a link on her site tomorrow.

Review copy provided by Zest Books.  I am an Indiebound Affiliate.

Book versus movie: The Hundred-Foot Journey

October 9, 2014

When the Haji family immigrates from Mumbai, India to Lumière, France they open an Indian restaurant right across the street from Madame Malloy’s well known gourmet restaurant.  At first she’s miffed but when she comes to realize young Hassan has true culinary talent she takes him under her wing, starting him on the journey to becoming a well known chef.

The Book

The Hundred-Foot Journey

I really enjoyed The Hundred-Foot Journey by Richard C. Morais but I wouldn’t go so far to say that I loved it.  I do love a good immigrant story and I found the rambunctious Haji family rather fascinating but I never felt emotionally invested in them.  Morais’ writes well but I thought his journalism background came through and the book lacked sentiment.

I did find the peek into the politics and hierarchy of French restaurants fascinating and was amazed at just how hard it is to earn the prestigious Michelin stars. Foodies will appreciate the descriptions of food and food preparation.

The Movie

 

 The Hundred-Foot Journey movieThe movie follows the basic plot of the book but several things were changed, including the Haji’s last name.  The changes made the movie lighter and a tad romantic.  The food and kitchen scenes are drool worthy.

The casting of The Hundred-Foot Journey was perfect and the acting was terrific.   Since the movie was mostly filmed in France, the scenery is gorgeous as well.

The Verdict

This is one of the rare instances where the movie surpassed the book for me.  I enjoyed them both but thought the movie made the story come to life.

weekend cookingI will be linking this up to Weekend Cooking which is hosted by Beth Fish Reads and is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, fabulous quotations, photographs. If your post is even vaguely foodie, feel free to grab the button and link up anytime over the weekend.

I won this book from Jo-Jo Loves to Read!!!  I am an Indiebound Affliate.

Wondrous Words Wednesday

October 8, 2014

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

This week’s words came from The Mouse-Proof Kitchen by Saira Shah.

1. dolmen – “”Downstairs,’ says Julien, ushering us back down to the dolmen.”

A dolmen is a prehistoric monument of two or more upright stones supporting a horizontal stone slab found especially in Britain and France and thought to be a tomb.

dolmen

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2. tractable – “But Yvonne, usually so tractable, is entirely unmovable on this issue.”

Tractable is an adjective that means capable of being easily led, taught, or controlled: docile.

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 What words do you want to celebrate today?

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