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Wondrous Words Wednesday

April 22, 2020

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

I found this word in MINI SHOPAHOLIC by Sophie Kinsella.

1. tup – “I gave him a tup.”

Tup is chiefly British and means a ram.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

11 Comments leave one →
  1. April 22, 2020 4:20 am

    Hi Kathy,

    We live in the heart of farming country, so ‘tup’ is a word I know quite well!

    I don’t read a lot of contemporary fiction, however I am intrigues at how this word came up in a book about shopaholics! 🙂

    Thanks for hosting and sharing your word – Stay Safe 🙂

    Yvonne
    xx

  2. April 22, 2020 7:19 am

    Hi — As Yvonne says, we need more context!

    My word today isn’t new: https://maefood.blogspot.com/2020/04/isolation.html

    be well… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

  3. April 22, 2020 7:33 am

    I love British words!

  4. April 22, 2020 10:23 am

    Hi,
    I’ve read several of Sophie Kinsellas books….I’ll have to add this one to my
    list…Have a great day

  5. April 22, 2020 2:18 pm

    I learned a new word today. Thanks, Kathy!

  6. April 22, 2020 3:01 pm

    Didn’t know that word.

  7. April 22, 2020 4:55 pm

    I didn’t know this one

  8. April 22, 2020 7:42 pm

    I like small words. “Tup” is lovely, though I can’t imagine ever getting a chance to use it.

  9. April 23, 2020 7:46 am

    I wouldn’t have guessed the meaning!

  10. April 23, 2020 11:04 am

    I learned something new today!

  11. April 30, 2020 1:19 pm

    I wasn’t sure if I should say this, but no one else has mentioned it yet. In Shakespeare’s day, “tupping” was a rude word meaning roughly what “fucking” means today. Iago shouts it in the street under Brabantio’s window, saying that Othello is “tupping” (his) white ewe.” In this sense the etymology of the word is related to “topping.” Iago is being extremely rude just as he is introduced to the audience.

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