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Wondrous Words Wednesday

March 18, 2020

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

I found two words in WILD GAME by Adrienne Brodeur.

1. mung – “Ben plucked off some bits of brown mung as he rolled his end of the net toward me.”

I’m not sure what the author meant here – if you know, please fill me in.  The only definition I could find of mung is a small, round green bean and the plant it grows on and that doesn’t work in this sentence.

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2. seiche – “Up, up, up I went, as if a whole ocean had been sucked up to form a rogue seiche.”

A seiche is a standing wave in an enclosed or partially enclosed body of water.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

7 Comments leave one →
  1. March 18, 2020 6:30 am

    I know mung bean, I’ve seen it in a lot of recipes.

  2. March 18, 2020 7:18 am

    No idea.

  3. Mae Sander permalink
    March 18, 2020 8:04 am

    Online dictionary defines mung as: “something disgusting or offensive, especially filth or muck.” I guess that’s it. Source: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/mung

    I guess my word today is “curry” as in the second episode of the new Ugly Delicious season on Netflix!

    best… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

  4. March 18, 2020 10:29 am

    I only know mung as a bean because I, believe it or not, love mung bean pasta and eat it all the time! I hope it’s not the same mung as in your reference, LOLOL

  5. Beth Hoffman permalink
    March 18, 2020 10:31 am

    I echo what Mary said!

  6. Lloyd Russell permalink
    March 18, 2020 10:51 am

    That would be no and no.

    Lloyd (408) 348-4849

    On Wed, Mar 18, 2020 at 12:04 AM Bermudaonion’s Weblog wrote:

    > BermudaOnion posted: ” Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you > can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love. > Feel free to get creative! If you want to play along, grab the button, > write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. ” >

  7. March 18, 2020 1:35 pm

    Mae’s definition of “mung” seems correct for its use in that sentence. It’s a good word, and it even sounds like its meaning.

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