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Review: Moonlight Over Paris

April 14, 2016

Moonlight Over Paris

My book club’s most recent read was Moonlight Over Paris by Jennifer Robson.  It’s set after World War I and is the story of Helene, a young woman who leaves her home in England to live with her aunt in Paris to attend art school.  She’s happy to leave the scandal of a broken engagement behind and enjoys the freedom her aunt allows her.  Helene loves the friends and the life she’s made but is faced with a difficult decision about her future.

Moonlight Over Paris was a little too sweet and predictable for my taste but everyone else really enjoyed it.  Someone mentioned that it was refreshing to read because no one died.  I think everyone enjoyed the time period and the Paris setting.  I will admit that our discussion wasn’t great but we did find a few things to talk about.  If you’re looking for a light, quick read this summer, you might want to consider Moonlight Over Paris.

Review copy provided by Harper Collins.   I am an Indiebound Affiliate.
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18 Comments leave one →
  1. April 14, 2016 6:20 am

    I like an uncomplicated read once in a while. This should do for me.

  2. April 14, 2016 6:49 am

    Ah, but it was great for yielding “ear tuck” quotes! :–)

  3. April 14, 2016 7:30 am

    Sweet and predictable can be OK once in a while if the setting and dialogue is interesting enough, but I had already been thinking I probably would skip this one. I hope you had macarons at your book club discussion!

  4. April 14, 2016 7:37 am

    I agree with Mystica and will keep it in mind.

  5. April 14, 2016 8:03 am

    There are times when sweet and predictable is fine, but those books don’t generally make for good book club discussions for my group either.

  6. April 14, 2016 10:38 am

    Interesting comment about no one dying. I just finished Salt of the Sea, by Ruta Sepetys. Since it takes place during WWII, obviously people die. But sometimes I think you find out how emotionally connected you are to a character if they actually don’t make it. Having said that, I’m definitely not advocating for people to die in order to enjoy a book. It is just one more element to consider.

  7. April 14, 2016 10:59 am

    I really enjoyed this one–but I know what you mean about it being too sweet. There wasn’t much conflict really. It was a nice change of pace from my more intense reads.

  8. Patty permalink
    April 14, 2016 11:03 am

    I have seen this book around and I have resisted it…I probably will keep on resisting…lol…

  9. April 14, 2016 12:30 pm

    Hmm, when I first saw the title, I was reminded of the movie with a similar name (Midnight in Paris), a Woody Allen film. Obviously not the same, as his rendition was anything but sweet. LOL.

    Thanks for sharing.

  10. April 14, 2016 4:20 pm

    I loved Robson’s 2 previous books a great deal! I’m sure I’ll really like this one.

  11. April 14, 2016 4:22 pm

    I can see that it would be difficult to have much to discuss about this book. Still, I loved that comment that it was refreshing no one died. 🙂

  12. April 14, 2016 9:11 pm

    Sounds kind of blah so I’ll probably skip it.

  13. April 14, 2016 10:35 pm

    My new book group met last night and we too read a book about a woman who went overseas during wartime. I think we liked ours better though 🙂

  14. April 14, 2016 10:42 pm

    Kathy, thanks for being honest. I hope your next book is more to your liking.

  15. April 15, 2016 5:49 pm

    I have this one in my TBR. I appreciate the honest review!

  16. April 16, 2016 8:55 am

    I have been meaning to read this author in general. Just have to actually get around to her!

  17. April 17, 2016 1:43 pm

    I think my tastes are similar to yours in that I’m not fond of “sweet” tidy stories. However, I wonder if this might be a good choice for Paris in July….

  18. bookingmama permalink
    April 24, 2016 6:56 pm

    Sometimes sweet is nice!

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