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Wondrous Words Wednesday

February 3, 2016

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

No new words from my reading this week so I turned back to my Word-a-Day calendar.

1. eldritch – “As a writer, she is best known for her eldritch tales of ghosts and otherworldly encounters.”

Eldritch means weird or eerie.  It’s also the first name of a Minister of Magic in the Harry Potter books, which I find quite fitting.

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2. ludic – “The playground resounded with the happy cries and galloping footsteps of ludic children.”

Ludic was coined by psychologists in the 1940s to describe what children do.  It’s an adjective that means of, relating to, or characterized by play: playful

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3. canaille – “I am not going to write for [the New York Weekly]  — like all other papers that pay one splendidly, it circulates among stupid people & the canaille.” — Mark Twain, Letter, June 1, 1867

Canaille has two meanings – 1: rabble, riffraff  2: proletarian.  Mark Twain was referring to the first meaning.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

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11 Comments leave one →
  1. February 3, 2016 5:46 am

    I didn’t know any of them.

  2. February 3, 2016 7:35 am

    I’d never heard of any of these words before. Well, eldritch sounded familiar, possibly because of the Harry Potter connection.

  3. February 3, 2016 9:19 am

    Good ones! Ludic sounds like a first name, too; wouldn’t be surprised if it was in a story somewhere as such. I think Rowling does a fab job of naming her characters.

  4. February 3, 2016 9:27 am

    Had heard the 1st one, although I didn’t define it correctly, and never heard of 2 & 3. Darn.

  5. Patty permalink
    February 3, 2016 10:42 am

    I can actually see myself using these words…maybe even all of them in the same sentence?

  6. February 3, 2016 10:46 am

    Zero for there here!

  7. February 3, 2016 10:57 am

    Mark Twain has always been a good source for obscure words.

  8. February 3, 2016 1:39 pm

    I like eldritch. It sounds similar to Eldridge and I think that’s very clever of Rowling. You found three good ones this week.

  9. February 3, 2016 4:07 pm

    Eldritch is my fave this week!

  10. February 3, 2016 4:09 pm

    Wohoo knew the first one

  11. bookingmama permalink
    February 4, 2016 6:55 pm

    Not a clue about any of them! I love how you tied eldritch back to a Harry Potter book!

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