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Wondrous Words Wednesday

July 9, 2014

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love.  Feel free to get creative!   If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

I only found two words last week, but they’re good ones.  My first word is from The Accidental Book Club by Jennifer Scott. (This is actually a quote from a book the book club read.)

1. vellicate – “She’d been hooking since she was thirteen, stuffing her grand, vellicating thighs into clothes three times too small, counting on her meth addiction to keep her thin, to keep her pretty, too blind to realize how not thin and not pretty she already was.”

Vellicate means to twitch, pluck, or pinch.  In this case, I’m sure the author meant twitch.

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My second word came from Season to Taste by Natalie Young.

2. clobber – “Everything from the drawer full of paper clips and batteries, old receipts and other clobber went in the bin.”

I knew clobber can mean to hit something but that didn’t fit this sentence so I did a little research.  According to Urban Dictionary, clobber also means clothes and personal belongings which makes perfect sense in the context of the book.

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What words do you want to celebrate today?

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13 Comments leave one →
  1. July 9, 2014 7:11 am

    Clobber also means cobbler, like “blackberry clobber” but I doubt that is what was in the drawer! LOL

  2. July 9, 2014 9:55 am

    0-2 today.

  3. Beth Hoffman permalink
    July 9, 2014 9:56 am

    I’ve never heard of clobber in that context before!

  4. Patty permalink
    July 9, 2014 10:56 am

    OMG…just the thought of vellicating thighs is a tad bothersome!

  5. July 9, 2014 12:52 pm

    Clobber is interesting. I wonder if they (whoever they are) might call their closet a clobber room? On the other hand, maybe someone would think that’s where the cobblers are kept. lol

  6. bookingmama permalink
    July 9, 2014 2:32 pm

    I don’t think I’ve ever heard clobber used that way. Very interesting.

  7. July 9, 2014 2:32 pm

    Hi Kathy,

    Clobber is an everyday word, here in the UK, with most men keeping their clobber in the garden shed and women keeping theirs in the wardrobe (and possibly one or two other rooms in the house as well!).

    Where many of you want to say cobbler for clobber, I keep wanting to say vacillate for vellicate, although they have two completely different defintions. Vellicate certainly conjures up images I would rather not think about!

    I like the sound of both these books, which have equally intriguing and interesting storylines, not to mention covers!

    No WWW from me this week, but thanks for stopping by my MM post this week.

  8. July 9, 2014 2:51 pm

    Both of your words are new to me. I like clobber rather than “Clutter” LOL

  9. July 9, 2014 3:34 pm

    New meaning for clobber for me today.

  10. July 9, 2014 4:35 pm

    I did not know that about clobber

  11. July 11, 2014 1:48 am

    I’ve never heard of that definition of clobber, either. I always thought of clobber as in knocking someone over the head. That’s how my mother uses it anyway! lol

  12. July 11, 2014 12:17 pm

    I would have never guessed at “clobber.” I immediately thought about hitting someone too. I’ll remember that one.

  13. July 11, 2014 1:25 pm

    Well that’s a new one for clobber. I’m afraid in my mind it will stay stuck on “a knock on the head” for me too.

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