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Wondrous Words Wednesday

May 25, 2011

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where we share new (to us) words that we’ve encountered in our reading.  If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!

Both of my words this week are from The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott by Kelly O’Coonor McNees.

1. pricket – “She turned the pages and a glowing candle on the table beside the bed sank into its pricket.”

I thought I knew what a pricket was from the sentence and I was right.  A pricket is a spike on which a candle is stuck.  I think this word sounds like what it is.

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2. pelerine – “The bride also wore a mink pelerine.”

I thought I knew what this one was too, but wanted to be sure.  A pelerine is a woman’s narrow cape made of fabric or fur and usually with long ends hanging down in front.

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Have you come across any new words lately?


21 Comments leave one →
  1. Veens permalink
    May 25, 2011 5:53 am

    New words to me, but they do sound nice 🙂

  2. May 25, 2011 6:37 am

    I kind of knew pelerine, but thank you for the definition!

  3. May 25, 2011 6:41 am

    Both words are new for me. I like that second word. I’ve seen women wearing those shawl like fur coats in the movies and maybe in church.

  4. May 25, 2011 9:37 am

    The second word is new to me. I have seen a pelerine but I didn’t know the word for it. Thanks!

  5. May 25, 2011 10:25 am

    I had pelerine from this story (the exact same line). Great words. I really enjoyed this book.

  6. May 25, 2011 10:28 am

    I was clueless on both of those, Kathy. Great finds!

  7. May 25, 2011 10:59 am

    Did not know those either 🙂

  8. May 25, 2011 11:42 am

    I also think pricket sounds like what it is. Thanks for sharing these with us!

  9. May 25, 2011 11:57 am

    You’re reading one of my favorite books from last year. Both words ring faint bells in my head but obviously haven’t become part of my memory or regular language.

  10. May 25, 2011 12:20 pm

    Like the word pelerine, a mink one would be very pretty.

  11. May 25, 2011 12:37 pm

    These are two new words for me. I know what a pelerine looks like so it’s nice to know its name! I agree that a pricket sounds like what it is although I think it’s an odd word!.

  12. May 25, 2011 12:53 pm

    First time playing! I knew the first one but not the second.

  13. May 25, 2011 2:17 pm

    I had no idea it was called a pricket!

  14. May 25, 2011 5:45 pm

    Kathy, I should have known these as I read this book last summer. I will learn them now! 🙂

  15. organizedmama permalink
    May 25, 2011 6:48 pm

    I read this book and I loved it. Just seeing this post made me smile, because I remember how enjoyable it was.

  16. May 25, 2011 7:07 pm

    Very cool words today! 😀

  17. May 25, 2011 10:10 pm

    Both are new to me, but there are good clues in the sentences.

  18. May 26, 2011 8:19 am

    Two great words! I love pricket. It certainly does sound like what it is. I’ve never had a need to know what that bit is called, but will try to remember.

  19. May 26, 2011 9:47 pm

    I’m trying to imagine a pricket but I don’t think I can. If I hasn’t read the sentence, I would have thought a pricket was an insult! 🙂

  20. kaye permalink
    May 28, 2011 4:09 pm

    Pricket – that’s a new one on me. Thanks for the definition.

  21. May 29, 2011 12:32 pm

    I hope that the wedding was in the midst of winter.. if not that will be a very sweaty mess 😉

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