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Wondrous Words Wednesday

February 23, 2011

Wondrous Words Wednesday is a weekly meme where we share new (to us) words that we’ve encountered in our reading.  If you want to play along, grab the button, write a post and come back and add your link to Mr. Linky!  All of my words this week came from my handy Word-a-Day calendar.

1. velleity– “Samuel talks about going back to school, but his interest strikes me as more of a velleity than a firm statement of purpose.”

Velleity means a slight wish or tendency: inclination.

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2. infix – “The Philippine language of Tagalog adds infixes such as -um- and -su- to verbs to convey different tenses and voices.”

Infix means a derivational or inflectional affix appearing in the body of a word.  Infixes are rare in English, but they are in the plural forms of some words, like passersby – the s is the infix.

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3.forfend– “Anticipating that the price of the stock would only continue to plummet, we sold our shares in an attempt to forfend a major loss.”

Forfend means to ward off: prevent.

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Have you come across any new words lately?

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22 Comments leave one →
  1. February 23, 2011 7:49 am

    O I like velleity!

  2. February 23, 2011 7:51 am

    I love infix – must find a way to work it into conversation! :–)

  3. February 23, 2011 8:45 am

    Fun words! I especially like infix. 🙂

  4. February 23, 2011 8:51 am

    I like forfend. I felt tempted to write “fore.” Had to look at the word again.

    http://readwithtea.blogspot.com/2011/02/wondrous-words.html

  5. February 23, 2011 9:30 am

    I didn’t know any of these words, so this post today was very edifying for me. Thanks, Kathy!

  6. February 23, 2011 10:24 am

    All new to me. I really like forfend. I’m going to try add it to my vocabulary.

  7. February 23, 2011 10:48 am

    Just imagine how many words we don’t know. Amazing!

  8. February 23, 2011 11:04 am

    We speak the same language !
    Velleity is just “velléité” in French and with the same meaning !

  9. February 23, 2011 11:04 am

    i am going to work these into conversation today!

  10. Alyce permalink
    February 23, 2011 11:09 am

    Yay – I knew one! 🙂 I learned all about infixes when I was studying linguistics, so that’s the only reason I knew what they were.

  11. February 23, 2011 11:14 am

    I knew the first two, but forfend is a very good one to add to my vocabulary! Thanks!

  12. February 23, 2011 12:20 pm

    These are all excellent words, Kathy.

  13. February 23, 2011 12:57 pm

    I love the Word-a-Day Calendars! The words you get are useful, too. I once had one with words that were entertaining but so far out you’d never use them.
    I can definitely see myself using forfend, which reminds me of forfeit, and velleity. I like velleity quite a bit!

    I posted some words:
    Amy’s words!

  14. February 23, 2011 3:38 pm

    New ones for me again 🙂

  15. February 23, 2011 3:59 pm

    great words, I didn’t know any of them.

  16. February 23, 2011 6:46 pm

    I love infix – never thought about that method of pluralization having its own term. It’s good to know the word for it. Now, if it would only show up as a trivia question next time we’re having family game time …

  17. February 23, 2011 9:10 pm

    Whoa…I’ve never come across any of those!

  18. February 23, 2011 9:49 pm

    Interesting words! I was only familiar with forfend.

    My words are here.

  19. February 23, 2011 11:01 pm

    I like infix. What a great concept! I love learning about language structures that are rare or nonexistent in English. They give such an insight into the many ways that humans think and communicate.

  20. February 25, 2011 8:31 am

    All of these seem useful, but will I remember them?

  21. February 26, 2011 8:02 pm

    forfend… no can’t apply that to buying books… love doing that way too much.

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